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10 of the Best Mountains to Climb in Vermont State

This is an aerial view of the massive Vermont mountains.

When it comes to stunning mountains and picturesque landscapes, one should look no further Vermont and the jaw-dropping summits it has to offer. So in the time it takes for you to lace up your hiking shoes and pack your snacks, we’ve compiled some of the best mountains that Vermont has to offer so you don’t have to embark on a long journey to find them yourself. So with this being said, here’s a look at the ten best hiking trails that Vermont has to offer.

Camel’s Hump

A hiker stands on top of Camel's Hump.

Location: In the Green Mountains, right off of Camel’s Hump Road.

Height: 4,083 feet.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 6 miles round trip via the Monroe Trail.

Level of difficulty: This trail is of moderate difficulty.

Equipment Needed: Extra clothing, fluids, and snacks. As one gradually climbs the summit, the temperature will drop (so dress accordingly.)

Best time to go: This hike is popular all year round, so any season is the best season.

Snowpack info: If you embark on this summit in the winter, you may want to pack snowshoes if there has been a heavy snowfall. It also gets colder near the peak, so dressing accordingly is suggested.

Pros: Once you reach its peak, it’s possible to see Canada on a clear day. Even if Canada isn’t visible, one can still see Mount Mansfield and Mount Washington on a cloudy day.

Cons: This hike is popular all year round. If you’re looking for a solo jaunt without seeing anyone, you might be out of luck.

Being Vermont’s third-highest mountain, it’s safe to say that your legs will be burning after conquering this hike.

The Long Trail 

A look at the cloudy and rocky Long Trail.

Location: This behemoth of a trail runs across the state of Vermont. That’s right, a trail that runs across the entire state.

Height: Some of the trails on The Long Trail are 3,500 and higher.

Length of climb: 273 miles, roughly 19 days if you’re traveling at 14 miles a day.

Level of difficulty: Due to the mud, rock, and length of this trail, this hike is very difficult and not recommended for beginners.

Equipment Needed: If taking on this monster in one trek, only bring what is necessary and travel light if possible. Light shelter, bug netting, earplugs, and no wood stoves as they are too wet.

Best time to go: Between June and Mid-October.

Snowpack info: Same as listed above, but this is no trail to take on if you haven’t done it during the warmer seasons or haven’t gone on camping hikes previously.

Pros: It is the oldest long-distance trail in the United States.

Cons: It is the oldest long-distance trail in the United States.

Yes, The Long Trail has the same pros as it does cons, but this trail is exactly what you’re looking for if you want to embark on a nearly month-long hike. Incredibly fulfilling, but suit for individuals who can handle marathons or long term hikes.

Mount Pisgah

A look at Mount Pisgah in fall colors.

Location: From Barton, you’ll need to drive east on VT-16 N for roughly 6.9 miles. Then, you’ll need to turn right onto VT-5A South. Continue for 3.5 miles. The pull-off parking is located on the east side of the road.

Height: 1,653 feet.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 4.1 miles.

Level of difficulty: This trail is of moderate difficulty.

Equipment Needed: Bug spray. Pants and long sleeves to avoid any chances of bringing along ticks.

Best time to go: Spring, summer, or fall.

Snowpack info: This trail isn’t recommended when raining or wet, so use extra caution if hiking during the winter.

Pros: Offers looks to the south, west, and north of the summit.

Cons: Dangerous when wet or raining.

Mount Pisgah is a great hike if you’re hiking to enjoy the scenery. If you happen to be a birdwatcher, you’ll be pleasantly surprised in regards to the birds you’ll encounter on this journey.

Mount Olga

Location: Molly Stark State Park.

Height: 508 feet

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 1.7 miles

Level of difficulty: This trail is of easy difficulty. Recommended for beginners or individuals looking to go on their first hike.

Equipment Needed: Little to no equipment is needed for this hike. Quite possibly the shortest hike on this list.

Best time to go: May through October.

Snowpack info: Feel free to pack light as the trail is under two miles long.

Pros: Features a river, recommended for all skill levels.

Cons: It’s a very short hike.

What’s great about Mount Olga is that it allows one to walk a leashed dog on the trail. If you’re in need of a view, you’ll have to climb the Fire Tower in order to see it.

Mount Mansfield

This is an aerial view of Mount Mansfield.

Location: Chittenden County.

Height: 2,880 feet.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 7.3 miles.

Level of difficulty: This trail is of moderate to experienced difficulty.

Equipment Needed: Proper footwear. The rocks can be slippery and wet (especially after a rainstorm.)

Best time to go: This trail is open all year round, but possibly less dangerous during the spring and summer months.

Snowpack info: This trail can be incredibly icy and slippery during the winter, so bring appropriate footwear.

Pros: Amazing scenic views. Dogs are allowed if leashed.

Cons: Can be crowded at the chin (where the view is the most amazing.)

Mount Mansfield is the highest peak in Vermont.

Mount Abraham

Location: Bristol, Vermont

Height: 1,735 feet

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 6.1 miles

Level of difficulty: This hike is difficult, which only becomes more difficult near the top.

Equipment Needed: It’s mentioned that one hiked with a toddler in tow, so you may not need anything if hiking alone.

Best time to go: May until October.

Snowpack info: Since the top is considerably more difficult than the rest of the hike, you may want to wear appropriate footwear during winter months.

Pros: Amazing views for such a short hike.

Cons: Some scrambling at the top that may prove difficult for some hikers.

Mount Abraham offers phenomenal views for such a short hike and you can even take your dog along (if they’re leashed.)

Hillwinds Trails

Location: Brattleboro, Vermont

Height: No information found.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 3.7 miles.

Level of difficulty: This trail is of easy to moderate hiking ability. Great for beginners or individuals looking to sharpen their hiking skills after an absence.

Equipment Needed: No equipment is necessary for this hike. Fluids at your own choosing.

Best time to go: Spring, summer, or fall.

Snowpack info: Just winter-appropriate clothing.

Pros: Leashed pets are allowed. Trails built for walking, hiking, and mountain biking.

Cons: May be too easy for advanced hikers.

The Hillwinds Trails are excellent for beginners looking to see if hiking is for them.

Spruce Peak

A look at Spruce Peak in winter.

Location: Near Cambridge, Vermont.

Height: 1,207 feet.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 2.8 miles.

Level of difficulty: This trail is of moderate difficulty.

Equipment Needed: Bug spray may be necessary for this hike.

Best time to go: Any season.

Snowpack info: Fluids.

Pros: A perfect trip for birdwatching and enjoying the outdoors.

Cons: Can be very mushy if planning a hike after a rainstorm.

This quick hike allows leashed pets if you’re looking to take your pet along for the adventure. This trail is part of The Long Trail and offers several different options for activity.

Hamilton Falls Trail

A close look at the Hamilton Falls Trail.

Location: Located near Jamaica, Vermont. One of two trails in Ball Mountain State Park.

Height: 889 feet.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 6.8 miles (an in and out trail.)

Level of difficulty: This hike is of moderate difficulty.

Equipment Needed: Fluids and snacks if you want to stick around to enjoy the scenery. Bug spray.

Best time to go: April until October.

Snowpack info: Fluids, snacks, and winterized gear to avoid losing footing on the slippery rocks. The trail increases in difficulty near the end, so it’s important to prepare beforehand.

Pros: The Hamilton Falls Trail features an incredible waterfall.

Cons: This trail is lightly trafficked. Admission fee due to it being a state park.

Leashed pets are allowed on the trail. Perfect for birdwatching or simply checking out the waterfall. A hotspot for tourists who love to hike.

Cantilever Rock Trail

Location: Sunset Ridge Trail, Underhill, Vermont.

Height: 2,575 feet.

Length of climb: The length of the climb is 4.6 miles.

Level of difficulty: This hike is of moderate to easy difficulty.

Equipment Needed: Snacks, fluids, possibly warmer clothes due to the elevation.

Best time to go: The best time to visit is during the fall to witness the fall foliage.

Snowpack info: Proper footwear. You’ll be hiking on slippery rocks, so you’ll want to make sure that your shoes are up to par when climbing.

Pros: Breathtaking view from the top. An excellent hike to bring friends along for the journey.

Cons: It can be significantly more difficult to hike in the winter.

All walks of life enjoy climbing Cantilever Rock Trails for the views and the selfies. So what are you waiting for?

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